New Comics – Week of 02/09/2015

This week, new releases are out on Wednesday as usual, but due to the bank holiday, our delivery is arriving that same morning, so the new comics won’t be on the shelves until the afternoon.

Click here to view a full list of this week’s comics.

Orbital in Conversation Episode 146 – The Fabled & Fairest Mark Buckingham!

Hello and welcome to Orbital In Conversation – the podcast of Orbital Comics in central London! We’re very excited to join the team at Multiversity Comics as not only are they an excellent group of people, but they share a similar level of taste and sensibility … It’s going to be a good fit.
 
On this episode, Chris sits down for a chat with writer/artist Mark Buckingham (Fables, Fairest, Miracleman). They discuss his early work as an animator with Aardman, working with Neil Gaiman on The Truth & Miracleman, his breakthrough as an inker in the ’90s, and what brought him back to pencilling again. They would’ve got further, but time was against them – so expect a follow-up soon.
 
Plus: as an extra bonus, the second-half of the episode features Mark walking guests through his recent exhibition at the Orbital Gallery, followed by a brief Q&A. There’s some really great stuff discussed throughout, so we hope you’ll stay with us through this slightly longer episode!
 
To get in touch, send feedback or submit projects for consideration, please email chris@orbitalcomics.com. And if you missed last week’s episode (or any others) you can find them right here or subscribe via iTunes.
 
Chris Thompson’s Twitter: @popculturehound
Chris Thompson’s website: popculturehound.com
 
Orbital Comics’ Twitter: @orbitalcomics
Orbital Comics’ website: www.orbitalcomics.com

The Orbiting Pod Episode 187

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Welcome To Episode 187 of The Orbiting Pod!

Join Michael, Adam, Will & Joe as they drop the needle on the rekkid to talk:

Hip Hop Family Tree #1 – is it a sick jam, or a dud beat?

Star Wars #8 – Are Han’s affections Solo, or seeking dual fates?

Secret Wars Secret Love #1 – the romance is burning, but do we swipe left or right?

all this, plus Howard the Human, Welcome Back, Book of Death & more!

Remember, you can follow The Podcast on Twitter, be our Facebook friend, and subscribe on iTunes!

Staff Picks – Week of 26/08/2015

Magneto #21
Cullen Bunn (w) Gabriel Hernandez Walta (a)
Marvel Comics

Chris says: Magneto struck me as an odd choice to carry his own title, but something about the character and the way he was approached really clicked … Despite my initial misgivings, it worked. This is easily my favourite thing Cullen Bunn has written and one of the better Marvel Now books. At times I’ve found his work to just be filler for the Big Two, but when given the right creative control and freedom he comes up with some incredible stuff. I’ve seen it with The Sixth Gun and The Remains, and now I’ve seen it here with Magneto. As with those aforementioned books, a lot of credit goes to the team assembled around him – and in this instance it’s pretty close to flawless. Gabriel Hernandez Walta’s art is stunning. I mean, stunning! The seamless blending of dialogue and imagery has done wonders for this book and given it a consistent quality and tone. Of course, none of that would have worked without Jordie Bellaire’s thoughtful coloring and palette that mesh so well with Walta’s art. I could even pick that it was Cory Petit on letters, bringing a complementary and cohesive style to this wonderful book. Issue 21 is sadly the last in the series and it’s a real shame. I feel like we won’t see this book return again when things are ‘All New’ and ‘All Different’, but for this brief period I’m glad we did. If you missed the run then you can pick up the first three trade paperbacks now, with the fourth and final one coming soon. You can hear more about Walta and his approach to comics in this discussion panel we did at last year’s Malta Comic-Con.

Ms. Marvel Book 1 HC
G. Willow Wilson (w), Adrian Alphona, Jacob Wyatt, Ian Herring (a)
Marvel Comics

Adam says: Collecting the first eleven issues of Wilson and Alphona’s acclaimed run, starring the inspirational Kamala Khan, this deluxe hardcover edition is a real and rightly-deserved treat. Since its original announcement, Ms. Marvel has been a pivotal part of the ongoing progressive changes of Marvel’s publication line, but crucially, it’s also been a very, very good comic book. In turns fun, positive, relatable, (melo)dramatic, thematically challenging, and downright cool, the series the creative team has built is terribly easy to become attached to. Each issue satisfies, with superb pacing and compelling character dialogue. And Alphona’s art is absolutely perfect for high school, with an equalizing effect where really nobody’s perfect, but everyone has an awkward and heart-warming uniquess.

It’s a beautiful thing to see the dawn of a new superhero, to follow her as she discovers her powers and takes up the mantle of her own personal hero. So maybe sometimes there’s simply nothing better than seeing a teenager from New Jersey really, truly catch on and join the ranks of Earth’s Mightiest Heroes.

Loki: Agent of Asgard #17
Al Ewing (w), Lee Garbett (a)
Marvel

Liz says: The Loki book came out not this week but last week, you say? No it didn’t, surely not. Would I lie to you? No way.

Or maybe the truth isn’t as important as the story you’re being told, as long as it’s a good story. The character of Loki (God of Mischief, Prince of Lies) has always been defined by his ability to outwit, outfox and outright lie his way out of danger and into power, under the noses of his most faithful comrades and his greatest enemies alike. Al Ewing and Lee Garbett’s brilliant last statement on Loki, in the final issue of Loki: Agent of Asgard, speaks to the strength of storytelling as greater than magic, sounder than brawn, more powerful even than truth. Did the Gods create Man, or did a man telling stories create the Gods? The major themes that ran throughout this series are all addressed; themes of change, themes of truth and themes of trust. He does it beautifully, and caps off his short but superb run with something as clever and extraordinary as any Loki fan could hope for. I’m going to miss this book a lot; trust me.

Hellboy in Hell #7
by Mike Mignola (w/a), Dave Stewart (c)
Dark Horse

Karl says: Ok, so it’s been an eternity since the last issue of Hellboy. Here begins the second arc of the big red guy’s descent into the underworld. It’s a fine opening shot, but the real gold here is an unbelievably dream sequence where Dave Stewart shifts the colour palette from the usual strong Hellboy style to a really soft, almost watercolour lightness.

This lasts briefly and brings to mind the work of Eric Powell, but we’re swiftly back into the regular colourfield as the tale creeps to a splendid climax via Macbeth’s “Double, Double, Toil and Trouble” verse which is absolutely perfect for Hellboy, good to have him back!

Sacred Heart
by Liz Suburbia
Fantagraphics

Camila says: Liz Suburbia has a bunch of great self-published comics. They are all pretty short though, and the type that leave you wanting to get your hands on more work by the same artist. Now that is finally possible, with this big great graphic novel, just released by Fantagraphics.

It has been in the making for a while, with a different version serialised online over the past few years. But the whole thing has been redrawn & partially rewritten for this printed version, which also has a few additional chapters that bring the story to an end. Check it out!

Orbital Director’s Commentary – Chip Zdarsky on Howard The Duck! [Audio]

Hello and welcome to Orbital In Conversation – the podcast of Orbital Comics in central London! We’re very excited to join the team at Multiversity Comics as not only are they an excellent group of people, but they share a similar level of taste and sensibility … It’s going to be a good fit. For these first two weeks we’ll be double-shipping episodes, so you can get a bit of a feel for us.
 
As a long-term comics fan – and events manager at Orbital Comics in central London – it’s always fun to do something more than just your average signing. Meeting a creator and having them sign your stuff is all well and good, but I really love the little things that happen in between … The anecdotes and stories creators share while people are in line or waiting at their table.
 
It got me thinking: what if there was a way to do that and provide a framework wherein people could talk about what went into the making of a book? And so, the Orbital Directors’ Commentaries were born! We’ve since had the pleasure of hosting Jason Aaron & Jason Latour to discuss Southern Bastards, Mike Carey talking about The Unwritten, and Becky Cloonan discussing her work on Gotham Academy.
 
But a little while ago Chip Zdarsky took to the stage to talk us through Howard The Duck. Chip went through the book page-by-page – sharing stories, revealing secrets, and giving the kind of insight you couldn’t get anywhere else. If you’ve heard Chip before (and if not you can listen to him here) then you’ll know just how funny he can be!
 
We recorded the evening for posterity and so – thanks to the expert work of Robin Harman – we’re pleased to share it with you this week. Hopefully we’ll have video of the night available at a later date, but for now you can listen and read along in your own book. So enjoy, and keep your eyes peeled for future Orbital Director’s Commentary nights!
 
To get in touch, send feedback or submit projects for consideration, please email chris@orbitalcomics.com. And if you missed last week’s episode (or any others) you can find them right here or subscribe via iTunes.
 
Chris Thompson’s Twitter: @popculturehound
Chris Thompson’s website: popculturehound.com
 
Orbital Comics’ Twitter: @orbitalcomics
Orbital Comics’ website: www.orbitalcomics.com
 
Chip Zdarsky’s Twitter: @zdarsky
Chip Zdarsky’s Tumblr: zdarsky.tumblr.com

New Comics – Week of 26/08/2015

Click here to view a full list of this week’s comics.

Orbital in Conversation Episode 145 – At the Pub with Jay Faerber!

Hello and welcome to Orbital In Conversation – the podcast of Orbital Comics in central London! We’re very excited to join the team at Multiversity Comics as not only are they an excellent group of people, but they share a similar level of taste and sensibility … It’s going to be a good fit. For these first two weeks we’ll be double-shipping episodes, so you can get a bit of a feel for us.
 
On this episode, Chris heads to the pub with writer Jay Faerber (Copperhead, Noble Causes, Near Death) to discuss the ins-and-outs of his career thus far. They cover the early days of fan fiction, finally breaking in with the Big Two, taking the plunge into creator-owned work, and then the move into TV writing with all the numerous comics and other projects along the way.
 
To get in touch, send feedback or submit projects for consideration, please email chris@orbitalcomics.com. And if you missed last week’s episode (or any others) you can find them right here or subscribe via iTunes.
 
Chris Thompson’s Twitter: @popculturehound
Chris Thompson’s website: popculturehound.com
 
Orbital Comics’ Twitter: @orbitalcomics
Orbital Comics’ website: www.orbitalcomics.com
 
Jay Faerber’s Twitter: @JayFaerber
Jay Faerber’s website: www.jayfaerber.com

Staff Picks – Week of 19/08/2015

X-Men – Age of Apocalypse Volume 1: Alpha
Lobdell, Waid, Nicieza, etc. (w) Garney, Madureira, Bachalo, etc. (a)
Marvel Comics

Chris says: This is the third time in a row I’ve picked a Marvel trade as my pick of the week, which should tell you two things: 1. I’m behind on my regular comic reading; and 2. Marvel are finally releasing the collections that people (well, me) want to read again. In this case it’s the excellent Age of Apocalypse storyline, which ran through all the X-books back in 1995. It’s hard to believe it was 20 years ago, and yet I still remember the books vividly and with an incredible fondness. Generation Next was one of the only comic books to ever make me cry – and it still has the desired effect (just wait until you reach the end of issue 4) … On that note, check out this week’s Secret Wars Journal #4. Sina Grace, in his Marvel writing debut, presents a short Psylocke story with a similar impact. This first volume of AoA features the Legion Quest arc that set things in motion, followed by the X-Men Alpha one-shot and the first issues of the accompanying mini-series. I can’t recommend this book highly enough, and the talent who were occupying the X-books at the time is quite stunning. Reading this again was a real treat, and I look forward to the next two volumes that will complete the storyline. It may have no bearing on the new Fox Studios film, but you can’t go wrong reading Age of Apocalypse. Enjoy!

Daredevil: The Man Without Fear TPB
Frank Miller (w), John Romita, Jr. (a)
Marvel Comics

Paul says: Seemingly out of print just as Netflix’s TV show hit, this is now back on the shelves and what a welcome return it is. Miller actually improves on the work he did during his tenure on the DD ongoing book in the ’80s, using the character he had rebuilt to retroactively install believable motivations for Matt Murdock’s journey from scared little boy to ass-kicking blind ninja/lawyer. Following him from twelve to twenties, Miller grounds his hero using the same grit and filth he mired Batman in, namely big-city corruption and smaller scale personal betrayals that are the stuff of good drama. It’s a man’s life-story first and a crime-drama second and that’s what makes it tick. His Murdock is a little morally flawed, a little tainted. You can see the echoes and parallels with Batman: Year One all over this, especially in the first attempt at crime fighting that, in Matt’s case, goes tragically south. But what sets this apart from his Bat-run is the amount of darkness he allows to seep into Matt’s life. NOTHING goes right for the guy. No wonder he loses his mind so often. A man constantly at war with himself, his morals and the two camps of mysticism he bows to: his Ninja teachings and the catholic church (represented by his mentor Stick, the replacement father and his mother, Maggie, who has become a nun). It’s a testament to how good Miller was in the ’80s that he can take these tiny details and expand them into satisfying thematic through-lines. If you haven’t read it yet, get it before season 2 hits.

Mox Nox TPB
Joan Cornellà (w/a)
Fantagraphics Books

Will says: Spanish cartoonist Joan Cornellà brings us a hearty collection of black humorous cartoon strips. Surreal and dark, these strips are not for the faint of heart. But if you have a heart of coal and a twisted mind like mine, then these cartoons will have you bursting with laughter. Each page is more bizarre and grotesque than before. It won’t do the book any justice for me to describe an example of a cartoon, but rather this is something you have to read for yourself. With some strips, you can see a clear theme, but in all honesty, other strips are so strange that I’m not quite sure I understand them or if there is even a point to them! Whether this is due to my naivety or sheer randomness, I still enjoyed every single glorious page. Get this book. You will be shocked and disturbed, but you will laugh all the way through.

Island #2
Brandon Graham, Simon Roy, Emma Rios & others (w/a)
Image Comics

Karl says: The second issue of this Brandon Graham curated anthology really delivers. A few pages of beautiful psychedelic Will Kirkby artwork quickly lead into three long, 20–30 page comics from Ludroe, Simon Roy and the second installment of Emma Rios’ gorgeous, and very red, I.D. story. Backed up with a few short text pieces, this substantial (120 pages) book is well worth the $7.99 price tag and reads a lot like a classic issue of Heavy Metal. It is golden age sized and one of the gems of the current Image Comics golden age. Bangin’!

The Orbiting Pod Episode 186

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Welcome to Episode 186 of The Orbiting Pod!

Join Joe, Adam, Owen & Will as they discuss:

John Flood #1 – does it keep us up at night, or put us to sleep?

Dark Corridor #1 – is it a fumble in the dark, or does it leave us carrying a torch?

Batgirl Annual #1 – It’s all in the family, but is it fortune, or fued?

All this and much more!

Remember, you can follow The Podcast on Twitter, be our Facebook friend, and subscribe on iTunes!

Orbital In Conversation Episode 144 – Doctor Who Comics Day Discussion Panel!

Hello and welcome to Orbital In Conversation – the podcast of Orbital Comics in central London! We’re very excited to join the team at Multiversity Comics as not only are they an excellent group of people, but they share a similar level of taste and sensibility … It’s going to be a good fit. For these first two weeks we’ll be double-shipping episodes, so you can get a bit of a feel for us.
 
On this episode, Chris hosts a live discussion panel in-store to celebrate Doctor Who Comics Day, featuring a number of creators behind Titan Comics’ Doctor Who line. It all starts with writers Paul Cornell, Al Ewing, Rob Williams & Nick Abadzis; and continues with artists Rachael Stott & Brian Williamson, alongside group editor Andrew James.
 
To get in touch, send feedback or submit projects for consideration, please email chris@orbitalcomics.com. And if you missed last week’s episode (or any others) you can find them right here or subscribe via iTunes.
 
Chris Thompson’s Twitter: @popculturehound
Chris Thompson’s website: popculturehound.com
 
Orbital Comics’ Twitter: @orbitalcomics
Orbital Comics’ website: www.orbitalcomics.com